Instructions for Legal Deposits

Receiving Libraries

  • The National and University of Iceland | Icelandic National Collection- Legal Deposits | Arngrímsgötu 3 | 107 Reykjavík | Sími: 525 5600 | Fax: 525 5612 | Netfang: skylduskil (hja) landsbokasafn.is| Veffang: landsbokasafn.is
  • Icelandic Film Museum | Hvaleyrarbraut 13  | 220 Hafnarfirði | Sími: 565 5993 | Fax: 565 5994 | Netfang: kvikmyndasafn@kvikmyndasafn.is | Veffang: http://kvikmyndasafn.is

New legislation and regulations concerning legal deposits

New legislation on Legal Deposits for Libraries (no. 20/2002) came into effect on January 1, 2003. At that time, the older legislation from 1977 ceased to apply. Furthermore, the Ministry of Culture has issued regulations concerning legal deposits for libraries (no. 982, 2003)

The legislation and the regulations specify legal deposits in detail, and in these instructions, only the main points are listed.

The largest changes from former legislation are, that in addition to printed items and sound recordings, material produced on some new media is also made subject to legal deposits, such as electronic works, works published on the Internet, movies, radio material, television material, as well as microform material and transparencies.

Furthermore, the main change is that the Icelandic Film Museum is added as a receiving library and a preservation institution. Former legislation focused only on the National and University Library of Iceland and the Public Library in Akureyri (Amtsbokasafnid á Akureyri).

What is legal deposit for?

It is important that material published in a particular country is preserved and kept from destruction and that it is securely preserved for the future and also made accessible for those who wish to use it for knowledge and research.

For this reason, most countries have created legislation which specify that the national library or another institution has the duty to preserve the cultural heritage which is here in question.

What should be delivered and where?

Works published or issued in this country should be delivered as legal deposits. Also works that are produced in a foreign country if they are specifically meant for distribution in Iceland.

The National and University Library of Iceland, which is the national library of Iceland receives the following material:

  Works on paper
  Microforms and transparencies
  Sound recordings
  Compound publications
  Digital publications
  Works published on a general computer network
 
The Film Museum receives: tekur við þessu efni:
   
  Movies
  Radio- and television programmes

The receiving institutions are responsible for the process of legal deposits. Their responsibility includes keeping contacts with the depositors and make sure that deposits are satisfactory and in line with the legislation and notify the depositors in question if things are not in order.

The receiving library must also provide information about legal deposits to the public and publicize the services to the public. /p>

Preservation and use

The following institutions preserve deposited material:

  The National and University of Iceland
  The Public Library in Akureyri (Amtsbókasafnið á Akureyri)
  The Icelandic Film Museum

These preservation libraries must provide the users with access to the material received through legal deposits, according to more detailed rules which each library can create. The libraries have the duty to preserve each item as well as possible, guarantee its safety and upkeep.

Cataloguing

The depository libraries must catalogue the material that is received through legal deposits. These catalogues are the key to the deposited material, and in fact to other material owned by the libraries.

A new library system, common for all libraries in the country, was taken into use on May 19, 2003. The National Library and the Public Library in Akureyri are partners in this new system and access to the catalogues is much easier than before.

Works on paper

Works published on paper can be printed, duplicated or multiplied through other means. Here the main categories will be listed with examples.

  • Books, including children ‘s books, textbooks, exercise books and musical scores.
  • Journals, series and newspapers,i.e., all works that are in numerical order or with dates, including daily newspapers, local papers, political magazines, school magazines, cartoons, papers from institutions and societies (e.g. staff newsletters), journals, yearbooks, television listings, annual reports and annual financial statements.
  • Reports and statements ; including scientific and scholarly reports, reports and statements of committees and institutions.
  • Maps, plans, posters ; including geological maps, sea charts, road maps and travel maps; also, relief maps and globes.
  • Pamphlets such as offprints, brochures, travel brochures, time tables, guidelines, advertisements, manufacturing descriptions, sales catalogues, price lists, poems, funeral print, single sheets, theatre programmes, exhibit catalogues, musical programmes, post cards, Christmas cards, pictures, drawings, playing cards, diaries, pocket books, Ex libris and calendars (edited and with text).

Works on paper shall be delivered in four copies. The National Library preserves three copies and the Public Library in Akureyri keeps one.

Works published in less than 50 copies shall be delivered in two copies.

New editions are included in legal deposits, as well as reprints (when it is specified in the new work that it is a reprint, or when a new print includes changes in the work, such as in cover, binding or type of paper).

When a work is produced both as a hard copy and a paperback, four copies should be delivered of each form.

Attachments, such as CDs, floppy disks, maps or videos should also be deposited and handed in at the same time as the main work.

The duties of legal deposits rests with the producer, i.e. the individual that delivers the final production, such as a printing office, a copying office, or a book-binding office when the works are produced in this country. If it is not clear who the producer is or if delivery fails, the receiving institution can request that the publisher deliver the copies of the material.

In the case of material that is produced abroad, the duty for legal deposits rests with the publisher.

A special note should be made that material produced by governmental institutions, such as schools, hospitals, social welfare agencies or research institution should also be delivered.

Exceptions from legal deposits
Exceptions from legal deposits are printed currency, such as bank notes, securities and stamps, as well as a variety of small prints, such as forms, packaging labels, stationary, business cards, envelopes and calendars without text.

Microforms and transparencies

three copies and the responsibility for delivery rest with the publisher.

The National Library preserves two copies and the Public Library in Akureyri one.

Sound recordings

A sound recording is any kind of media which holds records of speech or music, such as musical records, musical cassettes, CDs or audiobook.

Published sound recordings shall be delivered in three copies and the legal deposit duties rest with the publisher.

The National Library preserves two copies and the Public Library in Akureyri one.

Compound publications

Compound publications are works published in different forms but are distributed as one work. This can be attachments to a printed work, such as floppy disks, CDs, sound recordings or videos. It can also be works with different combination such as a series of slides with sounds.

Four copies of this compound material should be delivered and the responsibility rests with the publisher.

The National Library preserves three copies and the Public Library in Akureyri one.

Digital works

These are digital works, published on a floppy disk, CD-ROM or other media for use on computers. This can be many types of material, i.e., written text, speech, music or other sounds, films, computer graphics, computer games, visual arts, photographs, etc., as well as a combination of these forms, i.e. multimedia material.

Three copies of this material should be delivered and the responsibility rests with the publisher.

The National Library preserves two copies and the Public Library in Akureyri one.

Works published on a general computer network

These are works – webpages or other works – that are published or made accessible to the public on the Icelandic part of the World-Wide Web, i.e. on the Icelandic domain .is or material which is published on other domains in the Icelandic language.

The National Library should make a copy of this material and preserve it. The publishers of works in digital form on a general computer network, shall provide the National Library with access to the work, provide the Library with a password or other information which is necessary for this purpose.

The National Library shall have an extensive cooperation on the execution and arrangements of this harvesting, in particular with the operators of the largest domains.

The collection, preservation and use of this material will be given in more detail and guidelines will be issued.

Films

In the new legislation on Legal Deposits, the filmmeans any kind of moving picture material, independent of the technique or methods used for the production. This definition includes all types of film-making, such as moving pictures, short films, documentaries, educational films, cartoons, advertising films and previews for coming films.

Published Icelandic moving pictures that are produced on film, two copies shall be deposited. One copy should be an original (sound and picture) or equivalent, and the other copy a demo copy. If a film is published in another form one original (master) should be delivered and another comparable demo (a copy of the original, usable for screening in a movie theatre and television). Of items meant for the general market (to shops, video rentals, etc), two copies of each type should be delivered. These copies are preserved at Icelandic the Film Museum.

Icelandic movies that are published on video, videodisks or other comparable form, a further demo should be deposited.

The Icelandic Film Museum receives films and preserves those, with the exception that an additional copy of Icelandic videos and videodisks are preserved at the National Library./p>

Films that are published in more than one edition, such as an abridged version, a changed edition for a foreign market or an edition with foreign text, are all subject to legal deposits.

Foreign films with Icelandic texts or dubbed in Icelandic that are shown in movie theatres, one demo copy should be deposited. The Icelandic Film Museum is permitted to preserve only a selection of such movies.

Foreign films that have Icelandic text or are dubbed in Icelandic and are distributed to the public on videos, videodisks or a comparable form, two unused copies should be deposited.

Promotional material related to the films should be delivered in two copies.

As far as Icelandic films are concerned the depository duties are with the producer, but as far as foreign films are concerned the duty for deposit rests with the distributor.

Radio- and television programmes

Broadcasted programmes of the National Public Radio (RÚV) - both radio and television – shall be delivered in one copy. Other Icelandic radio- and television stations shall deliver one copy of those programmes which the depository library requests. Depository duties rest with the business operator.

The Icelandic Film Museum shall preserve the programmes in question and has the duties of supervision of the deposits as further detailed in Regulations.

The Icelandic Film Museum holds the right to make an agreement with the National Public Radio that they preserve their programmes, both radio and television.

Delivery of films to the Icelandic Film Museum is as follows:

Original copy of Icelandic movies on film shall be delivered within seven years from the first screening. A demo of such movies shall be delivered within two years from the first screening or publication.

Icelandic movies that are produced on video or on a form that does not require service from abroad for development, shall be delivered within one year from first screening or publication.

Foreign movies on film shall be delivered within one year from the last screening of the firsts exposition period. Foreign movies on video and videodisks shall be delivered within one year

Due dates

Material that the National and University Library of Iceland receives, shall be delivered as soon as possible after publication, and no later than February 1 and August 1 each year for works that have been published within the previous six months. It is permitted to deliver material more frequently.

Delivery of movies to the Icelandic Film Museum is as follows:

The original copy of Icelandic movies on film shall the delivered within seven years from the first day of screening. The demo of such films shall be delivered within two years from the first day of screening.

Icelandic movies that are produced on videos or in other form which does not require that a service is fetched abroad for development, shall be delivered within one year from first screening or publication.

Foreign movies on film shall be delivered within one year from the last showing of the firsts exposition period. Foreign movies on video and videodisks shall be delivered within one year.

Delivery status

Works that are subject to legal deposits shall be delivered in a final form, and in the form, which is meant for the users. Items shall be complete and faultless. Along with the main works, all the material which is produced as an attachment, shall be delivered, such as cases, boxes or holders, dustcovers or other wrappings, brochures or equivalent.

Registry of deposits

Along with each delivery of legal deposits, a registry shall be included. The registry should be listed: books, journals, newspapers and annual reports. It is not necessary to list all small print, or posters. It is enough to include on this list the word brochures or posters, if that is the case.

If the delivery includes compound material, or attachments, this should be specifically indicated.

The receiving library issues forms for delivery and gives more detailed guidelines about their use.

Costs

SSometimes the question arises on who should carry the costs of legal deposits. The new legislation on Legal Deposits indicates clearly the answer to this question. The depositor also carries the cost of legal deposits, unless it is a question of works on paper. Then it is the responsibility of the publisher.

Is this a part of legal deposits?

Overview

Yes No
Book, children’s books, textbooks, audiobooks Printed currency
Journals, yearbooks, annual reports, newsletters, television listings, glossy magazines Bank-notes
Newspapers, local papers, political magazines,
school magazines, cartoons
Securities
Scientific reports, committee reports and reports from institutions Stamps
Maps, geological maps, sea-charts, road maps, relief maps, globes Packaging, envelopes, stationary
Posters Forms, tickets
Small print, such as brochures, advertisements, price lists, theatre programmes, exhibit catalogues, musical programmes, Christmas cards, playing cards. Calendars (without text)
Published pictures and drawings Business cards, labels
Diaries, pocket books, calendars /td> Lithographs
Microforms (microfilms, microfiche) Books printed for foreign markets, distributed abroad
Transparencies Minutes of meeting (unpublished)
Sound recordings, such as CDs, cassettes, records Documents from businesses, institutions
Digital works, such as computer games, multimedia works  
Icelandic webpages and other documents from the World-wide Web.  
Moving picture, such as movies, short films, documentaries, educational films, cartoons, advertising films  
Radio programmes, television programmes.  
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